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    History & Overview

    The Korat originated in Thailand, where it was considered to bring good luck and fortune. It is a muscular, medium-sized cat with a blue-gray coat close-lying coat. This is a highly people-oriented breed that thrives on human companionship. The Korat is a very active cat and can sometimes be quite stubborn. This breed is slow to mature, often not developing completely until as late as the age of four.

    One of the oldest natural breeds, the Korat dates from the 14th-century Thailand. The Thais regard this cat they call Si-Sawat (pronounced see-sah-what) as a symbol of good fortune, and often present a pair to a bride to ensure wedded bliss. Two cats sent to the United States in 1959 were the first true Korats to reach the West.

    Korats have an extraordinary hearing, sight, and sense of smell. Unlike other cats, their hair doesn’t float loose with petting. As a result, people who are ordinarily allergic to cats can tolerate a Korat in their homes.

    Character

    Astonishingly powerful, intelligent, and somewhat reserved, the Korat has a very soft voice. It is a well-behaved, calm, friendly animal, and very faithful. Terms used to describe this breed include: intelligent, inquisitive, gentle, active, soft-voiced, shy, powerful, faithful, reserved, calm, friendly, swift, agile and playful. Korat cat males are said to make good fathers if left with their kittens. They are unusually territorial and will hiss and growl at unknown intruders. 

    Appearance

    The Korat is a trim, medium-sized, muscular, short-haired cat with tall ears and a heart-shaped head. The luminous green eyes are unusually large and prominent. The silver-blue coat is glossy and fine, lying close to the body—essentially a hot-country coat. The hairs have a delicate, silver tipping, known in the East as “sea-foam”.

    Video Credits: Animal Planet, Discovery Channel

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